Legendary Oni Village "Oe"

Shuten-douji no Sato

Shuten-douji no Sato offers a variety of ways for visitors to enjoy themselves throughout the seasons such as forest trips to see the newly sprouting greenery in the spring; mountain stream fishing, insect collecting, and camping school in the summer; hiking while gazing at the sea of clouds in the autumn; and playing in the snow in the winter. Located on the Mount Oe mountainside, Shuten-douji no Sato is cool even in the summer, making it a popular spot for camping schools and sports. During this season the area attracts a large number of both locals and people from further away in the Keihanshin region for camping school which includes hiking on Mount Oe, study meetings, and river sports; sports camps, wind instruments, sports youth clubs, children's clubs, and more.

Access

Approximately 20 minutes by City Bus from the "Oe Eki Mae" stop on the Kyoto Tango Railway.

Map here

Japan Oni Exchange Museum

This museum focusing on oni is located at the bottom of Mount Oe, which is the setting for many oni legends. The museum has exhibits and materials on the oni of Mount Oe, oni in other places in Japan, oni throughout the world, oni gawara Japanese gargoyles, and more.
Admission fees: Adults: ¥320, High school students: ¥210 yen, Elementary school students: ¥160
Closed: Mondays (or the following day when a Monday falls on a holiday)

Access

Take train to Oe Station on the Kyoto Tango Railway, then take City Bus bound for "Oeyama no Ie" to the last stop.

Map here

Heisei no Ooni (giant oni)

This 5 meter tall, 10 ton giant oni gawara Japanese gargoyle is the largest in Japan and stands in front of the Japan Oni Exchange Museum. This oni gawara Japanese gargoyle was built by oni gawara artisans affiliated with the "Nihon Onishi no Kai" (Japan Oni Gawara Artisan's Society), which was formed in 1989, the first year of the Heisei period, and was made by firing and assembling 130 separate parts.

Access

Take train to Oe Station on the Kyoto Tango Railway, then take City Bus bound for "Oeyama no Ie" to the last stop.

Map here

Motoise Naiku Kotaijinja Shrine

Motoise Naiku Kotaijinja Shrine has one of the only two black lumber tori gateways in the country, and is a shrine with a long and distinguished history, said to have been established more than 54 years before the Grand Ise Shrine in Mie Prefecture.

Access

15 minutes' walk from Oeyamaguchi-Naiku Station on the Kyoto Tango Railway.

Map here

Motoise Geku Toyokedaijinja Shrine

Motoise Geku Toyokedaijinja Shrine is dedicated to the agricultural god "Toyoke No Okami" who descended from heaven to the Tango region, and so is referred to as the main shrine of the Grand Shrine of Ise Geku.

Access

5 minutes' walk from Oe Station on the Kyoto Tango Railway.
15 minutes' walk from Oe-Koko-mae Station on the Kyoto Tango Railway.

Map here

Amano Iwatojinja Shrine

Amano Iwatojinja Shrine is located in a rocky ravine that seems a fitting place for the legend that it is where gods descended from heaven. The main temple and the Gozaishi (seat stone) where the gods were said to sit are enshrined in this secluded location remote from any settlements.

Access

20 minutes' walk from Oeyamaguchi-Naiku Station on the Kyoto Tango Railway.

Map here

Mount Oe Mountain Range and the sea of clouds

Mount Oe is a mystical mountain which is the setting for a number of Oni legends including the Oni "Shuten-doji". It is also a natural treasure trove, making it a perfect hiking destination.
The "sea of clouds" that can be viewed from Onitake Inarijinja Shrine at the 8th station in the autumn makes the peaks of the mountains appear like islands floating in a milky white sea.

Access

Access to Mount Oe 8th station Onitake Inarijinja Shrine
Take train to Oe Station on the Kyoto Tango Railway, then take City Bus bound for "Oeyama no Ie" to the last stop and walk 1 hour.

Map here

Beech tree primeval forest

The beech forest is a precious remaining primeval forest. The forest was designated a "Quasi-national Park" on August 3, 2007.